It is certain, as we have said, that a fruitful egg is not produced without the concurrence of 출장마사지 the cock and hen; but this is not done in the way that Aristotle thought, viz. by the cock as prime and sole ‘agent,’ the hen only furnishing the ‘matter.’ Neither do I agree with him when he says:[224] “When the semen masculinum enters the female uterus, it coagulates the purest portion of the catamenia;” and shortly afterwards: “but when the catamenia of the female has set in the uterus, it forms, with the semen masculinum, a coagulum like that of milk; for curd is milk containing vital heat, which attracts like particles around it, and combines and coagulates them; and the semen of the male (genitura) bears the same affinity to the nature of the catamenia. For milk and the menstrual discharge are of the same nature. When coagulation has taken place, then an earthy humour is excreted and is drawn around, and the earthy portion drying up, the membranes are produced both as matter of necessity, and also for a certain purpose. And these things take place in the same manner in all creatures, both oviparous and viviparous.”

But the business in the generation of an egg is very different from this; for neither does the semen, or rather the ‘geniture,’ proceeding from the male in the act of intercourse, enter the uterus in any way, nor has the hen, after she conceives, any particle of excrementitious matter, even of the purest kind, or any blood in her uterus which might be fashioned or perfected by the discharge of the male. Neither are the parts of the egg,{294} the membranes, to wit, and the fluids, produced by any kind of coagulation; neither is there any thing like curdled milk to be discovered in the uterus, as must be obvious from the foregoing exercises. It follows, therefore, and from thence, that neither does the conception, whence the animal springs, as the herb arises from a fruitful seed, comport itself in the manner Aristotle imagined, since this takes place in viviparous animals in the same way as the egg is formed in oviparous animals, as he himself avows, and as shall be demonstrated by and by in our observations. Because it is certain that eggs of every description—prolific and barren—are engendered and formed by the hen singly, but that fecundity accrues from the male alone;—the cock, I say, contributes neither form nor matter to the egg, but that only by which it becomes fertile and fit to engender a chick. And this faculty the cock confers by his semen (genitura), emitted in the act of intercourse, not only on the egg that is already begun, or is already formed, but on the uterus and ovary, and even on the body of the fowl herself, in such wise that eggs which have yet to be produced, eggs, none of the matter of which yet exists either in the ovary or in any other part of the body, are thence produced possessed of fecundity.It is certain, as we have said, that a fruitful egg is not produced without the concurrence of the cock and hen; but this is not done in the way that Aristotle thought, viz. by the cock as prime and sole ‘agent,’ the hen only furnishing the ‘matter.’ Neither do I agree with him when he says:[224] “When the semen masculinum enters the female uterus, it coagulates the purest portion of the catamenia;” and shortly afterwards: “but when the catamenia of the female has set in the uterus, it forms, with the semen masculinum, a coagulum like that of milk; for curd is milk containing vital heat, which attracts like particles around it, and combines and coagulates them; and the semen of the male (genitura) bears the same affinity to the nature of the catamenia. For milk and the menstrual discharge are of the same nature. When coagulation has taken place, then an earthy humour is excreted and is drawn around, and the earthy portion drying up, the membranes are produced both as matter of necessity, and also for a certain purpose. And these things take place in the same manner in all creatures, both oviparous and viviparous.”

But the business in the generation of an egg is very different from this; for neither does the semen, or rather the ‘geniture,’ proceeding from the male in the act of intercourse, enter the uterus in any way, nor has the hen, after she conceives, any particle of excrementitious matter, even of the purest kind, or any blood in her uterus which might be fashioned or perfected by the discharge of the male. Neither are the parts of the egg,{294} the membranes, to wit, and the fluids, produced by any kind of coagulation; neither is there any thing like curdled milk to be discovered in the uterus, as must be obvious from the foregoing exercises. It follows, therefore, and from thence, that neither does the conception, whence the animal springs, as the herb arises from a fruitful seed, comport itself in the manner Aristotle imagined, since this takes place in viviparous animals in the same way as the egg is formed in oviparous animals, as he himself avows, and as shall be demonstrated by and by in our observations. Because it is certain that eggs of every description—prolific and barren—are engendered and formed by the hen singly, but that fecundity accrues from the male alone;—the cock, I say, contributes neither form nor matter to the egg, but that only by which it becomes fertile and fit to engender a chick. And this faculty the cock confers by his semen (genitura), emitted in the act of intercourse, not only on the egg that is already begun, or is already formed, but on the uterus and ovary, and even on the body of the fowl herself, in such wise that eggs which have yet to be produced, eggs, none of the matter of which yet exists either in the ovary or in any other part of the body, are thence produced possessed of fecundity.